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>> this is al jazeera america. live from new york city. i'm stephanie sy with a look at today's top stories. in beirut a car bomb has killed lebanon's finance adviser and he had also been lebanon's ambassador to the u.s. he was an outspoken critic of syria and hezbollah. >>> there was heavy fighting across the country. three people were killed and 250 have been arrested. the clashes come days after the interim government declared the muslim brotherhood a terrorist organization. >>> a federal judge in new york city has ruled that the national security agency's bulk collection of telephone records is legal. the ruling comes juster after a week when the program violates the u.s. constitution. >>> connecticut state police have released thousands of documents relate together mass shooting at sandy hook elementary. 26 people were killed, including 20 children. >>> the u.s. and japan have settled their dispute over a marine base in okinawa. they'll move the base to a remote part of the island. you can always head to our website at www.aljazeera.com. >> america's cities are a mixed bag. som
sea ice blocked their path. >> we wish everybody involved there well. o stay with d.w. >> new york city where the stars arizona much a party of the city as the skyline where dreams and illusions are intertwined. new york is the cultural capital of the world. she came here from germany just four weeks ago. it is a bold move but danica's dream is to make it on broadway idealy with a role in phantom of the opera. two years and i will be up there she is as. it all started when i was 4. we have come to new york to find germans who are living the american dream. what drives them. what hurdles did they have to vercome. annika's mother took her to phantom of the opera when she was 4 years old and the budding singer fell in love with the story of the choir girl that became an opera star. she is as the story captivated her. the music and the whole production moved her. she wanted to be like christine, a singer. now she is as she is closer to er goal. annika wants to make it big like her favorite musical protagonist but the 25-year-old will only be able to stay in new york with a work visa an
was 4. we've come to new york to find germans who are living the american dream what drives them, what hurdles that they have to vercome. annika's mother took her to "phantom of the opera" when she was 4 years old and she fell in with the story of a choir girl who became an opera star. she says the story captivated her when she first saw it. the music, the whole production moved her. she wanted to be like christine to be a singer. now she says, she's closer to er goal. annika wants to make it big just like her musical protagonist but she will only be able to stay in new york with a work visa and for that, she will need a ontract with a music producer. annika makes ends meet with occasional performances in restaurants. photos of american stars have a special place in many new york bars. can has some experience. she had dozens of gigs in germany after finishing her dancing degree. here, the pressure is really on to look her best. i hope no one looks at my feet, she says. i've got a stain but there's no time for that now. looking good is part of the job and she will never be sure who will
after a commuter train goes off the tracks in new york city. we're also following the outpouring of grief in hollywood and beyond after a fiery car crash claims the life of "fast and furious" actor paul walker. "reliable sources" will return next sunday as new host cnn's senior media correspondent brian stelter. let's beginning in new york where emergency crews are on the scene of a deadly commuter crash. a number of cars went off the tracks near the spuyten duyvil station. >> i just heard a screeching noise, you know. i happened to be by the window. i'm on top of the hill. i heard a screeching noise. and then within seconds the ambulance and fire trucks started coming past my window. i knew something big happened. there had to be 50 or 60 trucks coming by. >> for more, let's go to cnn's alexander field in the bronx at the scene of that derailment. alexandria? >> reporter: we know that seven cars derailed at the tail end of this holiday weekend. two cars turned on their sides and that's where four people were killed. 11 people are in critical condition. estimate is there were 100
, appearing on book notes in 1992 to discuss her book, that grows in the balcony, women, men, and the new york times. a book chronicles the history of sex discrimination at the new york times and details the class-action suit brought against the times by seven women in 1974. that suit was settled in favor of the women. this is about an hour. >> why did you call your new book the girls in the balcony? >> the balcony is a wise about any of the national press club. the institution until just 20 years ago. and win in 1955 the men decided that they would let anyone into cover to report on events, they put it in a very narrow, extremely uncomfortable about any at the far end of the ball room. .. >> guest: but just 20 years ago i was standing this that balcony. we could not ask questions, we were not allowed. it was, um, it was frustrating. and so one of the three women in "the new york times" bureau told scotty rustin one day that she would not go there anymore and two other women, myself and eileen shanahan who covered finance and high economics, said that we wouldn't cover assignments there. it's
announcer: ladies and gentlemen, 2005 kennedy center honoree tony bennett. ("new york state of mind" playing) we came of age with the legacy of the great american songbook, created by... george gershwin... jerome kern... the great cole porter... and interpreted by frank sinatra, ella fitzgerald, nat king cole, and then myself. (laughter) the whole world loves these songs. but times change, and there was an opening for another songbook. enter billy joel. (applause) billy's an exciting performer who can move and electrify audiences. he does it singing the songs of billy joel. great songs on subjects from love to war, from triumph and to loss. and stories about ordinary people with extraordinary emotions. and he puts them to tunes that you can't get out of your head. what a thrill it was for me to perform with billy in front of 110,000 of our fellow new yorkers at shea stadium, singing his ♪ "new york state of mind." ♪ billy joel... (applause) (chuckles) wow. billy joel is no less than a poet, a performer, a philosopher and today's american songbook. (applause) ♪ bennett: hicksvi
... >>> hello, welcome to al jazeera america. i am jonathan betz in new york. >> we are going fast and as it hit the curve, it was flying. moments of panic on a new york train as investigators tried to figure out what went wrong. >>> anger growing in ukraine. the largest protest in that country in nearly a decade. >>> demands that thailand's prime minister must go violent in bangkok streets and calls for a national strike. >>> tonight, crews are working to clear the scene of a train crash in new york city that de-railed on its way to manhattan. at least four people are dead, 63 more hurt of those, at least 11 are in critical condition tonight. al jazeera kimberly dukehardt has the latest from the bronx. >> fire fighters, police and the ntsb could not working through the night, checking the tracks, the actual train cars, mechanical equipment, communication equipment, to try to figure out what went horrible wrong. the holiday weekend ended in tragedy and chaos for those on board this suburban commuter train in northern new york city. the crash happened early sunday morning. >> incide
we are staying on top of breaking news. a new york transit official tells nbc news four people are dead after a train derailed in new york city. the metro north line derailed in the bronx just a short time ago. we also just learned from our sister station in new york that the number of injured people has gone up. they are now citing at least 63 people injured, and of those, about a dozen critically injured. the train was on a curve when this happened. something to keep in mind on a busy travel day. amtrak service affected between manhattan and albany, new york. ntsb investigators are getting ready to leave washington now and head to the scene of the crash. something that we're learning also that that area is known for tricky turns and curves and conductors were known to slow trains down as they approached those areas. no telling what caused this. we are waiting for a news conference with governor andrew cuomo. we'll bring you it latest information as it comes in. keep it here on nbc 4. you can go to nbcwashington.com for updates. >>> police arrested a man who accidentally fired
>>> welcome to al jazeera america. i'm jonathan betz in new york. investigators ascertaining for what went wrong after a deadly train derailment in new york. the first in decades. >> we lost four new yorkers this morning. we have 11 critically injured who are still in the hospitals, and i would ask all new yorkers to remember them in your prayers tonight. >> ukraine has seen a large protest as the orange revolution nine years ago. >> and the leader of protests in thailand is calling for a national strike and tells the prime minister she must resign. >> tonight rescuers in new york city are uprighting toppled train cars, searching for more victims in the deadly train crash. the train derailed in the bronx on the way to manhattan. at least four are dead. there are 63 confirmed injuries. 11 are listed in critical condition. >> al jazeera's kilmeny duchardt is live at the scene. what is the latest on the investigation? >> tonight, on this very chilly night, firefighters, police, crews and the mtsb are combing through every part of the scene down there right now, looking at the tr
on wall street buu they are movg their money out of new york because of high taxes. >> health care problem over the top, what if presidt obama went undercover to fix them? the big time ceo who did that? he has a bigger message are the president. >> after working that one week, going through all tasks and seeing you on unphysically fit i was, i could not work a physical day for 8 hours, i was huffing and puffing at night, i was physically exhausted, i was humoous it was embarrassing this is the quicksilvecash back card from capital one. it's not the "juggle a bunch of rotating categories" card. it's not the "sign up for rewards each quart" card. it's the no-gas, no-messing-'round, no-earning-limit-having, do-i-look-like-i'm-joking, turbo-boosting, heavyweight-champion- of-the-world cash back card. thiss the quicksilver cash back card from capital one. unlimited 1.5% cash back on eve purchase, everywhere, every single day. miael adams? here. michael adams? here. [crying] michael adams? announcer: students who miss 18 days of school in any grade risk falling behind and not graduating. absence
unknown revolutionary war spies to infiltrated british ranks in new york credited with turning the tide of the war. this program is about an hour. >> host: brian, this is a terrific, engrossing book. why did george washington need a spy ring, and where did he need it? >> guest: well, thank you, first off. he needed the spy ring because of the numbers problem and experience problem. at tops, 9,000 troops, at the low point, 3,000 troops, british had 40,000 troops. >> host: over the whole course of the war. >> guest: over the whole course of the war, up to 80,000 troops, almost annihilated, the revolution almost broke before his eyes. >> host: what year are we? >> guest: year 1776 is when he really comes over, after the success, i consider success at bunker hill. you want boston, i give you boston, go to canada, regroup, and washington, they go back to new york. they come back to new york city, and he knows he can't face them. he knows he can't beat them head-to-head, so he uses espionage, guerrilla warfare, anticipates them. only logic that brings you to, well, he needs a spy force. he ne
>> from comedy central's world news headquarters in new york, this is "the daily show" with jon stewart. ["daily show" theme song playing] [cheers and applause] >> jon: welcome to "the daily show". my name is jon stewart. tonight's guest -- we have a good one univision and fusion anchor jorge ramos is joining us. first if it took you long tier to get your -- if it took you a little bit longer to get your sausage mcmuffin this morning it wasn't because the sausage crop had eye poor concreate. >> staging a walkout saying it's nearly impossible to survive on $7.25 an hour. >> jon: the wages are so low some fast food workers have had to resort a life of crime. [ laughter ] or worse prostitution. [ laughter ] you have a pretty mouth there grimace. [ laughter ] so the question is: raise the minimum wage from the very difficult to live on $7.25 an hour to something more livable. it seems reasonable for an industry that is that profitable. so let's hear while it will be destroy the very foundation of our democracy. >> let's give people more purchasing power. >> that's the daysan view,.
it here. >> undercover and now she's taking us to new york city where some of the toughest put it to the test. >> the engineer who designed the bionic eye. he takes us to colorado to meet the man who created the 3d bionic hand. i've seen a lot of amazing things in the field, but this is really cool. that's our team, now let's do some science. [♪ music ] >> hi, guys, we are back here at "techknow" for another week of amazing stories and screen and innovation. we'll get started with this "heart in a box." check it out, this is an actual beating heart outside of the body. this is seriously the most amazing thing i've ever seen and touched. let's check out the story. >> when it comes to heart transplants, it's always a race against time. we've all seen it on tv. when a donor heart becomes available, medical teams must move quickly. the organ is removed and preserved by placing it in ice. the heart must arrive at the recipient's hospital within six hours that's because the ice damages the heart making it unfit for transplant. in this will keep hearts warm and beating. this will be
well known blogger on the baseline scenario and "new york times" in october in 2007 and 2008. he served as chief economist of the international monetary fund. so i will invite mr. ahmad and professor johnson to provide opening remarks and then there will be an opportunity for colloquy and an opportunity for questions from the audience. without further adieu. >> i should speak from here. >> thanks. so i'm going to talk about history. and i'm going to talk about what the fed did in 1929 to 1933 and compare it to what the fed did this time around. some background. there were a the lot of parallels between the two decades. so 2000s were early similar to the 1920s. in both cases they were boom times characterized by enormous sense of confidence about the future. there were new technologies in the 1920s with automobiles and radio. in the 2000s it was the internet. investors persuaded themselves that we entered an era of prosperity. at the same time in both cases, policymakers were struggling with major. in the '20s it was between europe and the u.s. as europe was trying to rebuild itself afte
on wall street buu they are moving their money out of new york because of high taxes. >> health care problem over the top, what if president obama went undercover to fix them? the big time ceo who did that? he has a bigger message are the president. >> after working that one week, going through all tasks and seeing you on unphysically fit i was, i could not work a physical day for 8 hours, i was huffing and puffing at night, i was physically exhausted, i was humongous it was embarrassing >> as a result of the journey i expeexperience on undercover bo. i have to make sure i am in best shape as well as getting the company into shape. >> mitch model went undercover and learned more about his company than he could have imagined. mitch, seems like ceo leaders in washington could learn a thing from you. i watched that episode, i like it a lot. you really, it hit home with me, you were honest about what you learned. about how detached you were from the very business you were running. >> it is incredible. i thought i was attached to the company, i spent a lot of times going to the store, unt
important roles in this history. and of course, arthur sulzberger, jr., publisher of "the new york times." i want to start with a question to each of the panelists, , and it has toim do with the state of journalism. if you are a doctor and the state of american journalism was your patient, how would you assess the diagnosis? >> if you look at the data, you would be concerned. the number of journalists has gone down by about 30% in the last seven or eight years. newspaper revenue is down by about 55%. you see a distance between the digital landscape. if you froze things right now, you would say, the patient needs a lot of work and there is a continued progress on that work. if you look forward there are some very exciting things on the horizon. one of the things i am most excited about journalism is that journalists essentially network on their own. if you see some of the work that "the new york times" has done from a digital standpoint, you see what can be done. consumers want high-quality content and i think there is a big role for journalism in the future. if you froze it right now, i thin
in to in "the new york times" we will talk about the feedback from that peace. we also have robert reed who is also known to all of you his specialty is career studies in the latest book is once you go black, black intellectuals of america. and also a distinguished scholar. we have brenda wineapple who is a neighbor of mine. [laughter] living on the upper west side the author of the static nation of a book about the pivotal years as civil war reid makes it self. to talk about culture a.m. the various ways that went into make the american nation. i think we are supposed to have 10 or 12 minutes a piece? and then david will respond. we are here to celebrate his work of the american a renaissance after a trip to five years jews see the enormous influence the book has had of cultural studies and history and politics. and sean wilentz has a four word? you wrote to go forward as well to get it started. thank you very much. >> can you hear me? is that all right? it is great to be here to celebrate david's book i can do this twice. two years ago i had the privilege to write the foreword of a new ed
is that infiltrated the british ranks of new york credited with turning the tide of the war. this program is about an hour. >> this is a terrific and an engrossing book. begin by telling me why did george washington need a spy ring and where did he need it? >> guest: thank you first off. he needed a spy ring because he has a numbers problem and experience problem. i believe he had 9,000 troops and at the low point he had 3,000. the british entered with 40,000 -- over the whole course of the war and they get as much as 80,000. washington sees what happened in new york and saw that he almost was annihilated and saw the revolution almost right before his eyes after all the success in massachusetts and said -- >> host: what your? >> guest: 1776 is when he really comes over after the success, i consider it a success at bunker hill. they said you want boston i will give you boston. they went to canada to regroup and washington said i know exactly where they are coming back, to new york. so they come back to new york city and he knows he can't face them or beat them head-to-head so he has to use espionag
york on january 1 bill deblasio becomes the mayor of new york which means michael bloomberg gets one more new year's eve as mayor and from what i understand he's going all out this new year's eve. [ laughter ] but what will -- [ applause ] surprisingly good shape. what will life be like in new york without a billionaire in zmarg for more we go to the resident deranged millionaire mr. john hodgman. welcome to the program. >> thank you. >> jon: thank you for joining us. >> it's great to be here and now goodbye. >> jon: where are you going? what? >> i'm leaving new york forever, john, when i heard that this six foot five sandinists yette was coming it our city goodbye. >> jon:. >> i'll all right i'll stay. after everything the wealthy have done for you mayor bloomberg understands. >> if we do get every billionaire around here it would be a good send. they would pay a lot of taxes, spend a lot of money in the stores and restaurants and create a big chunk of our economy and we take tax revenues from those people to help people throughout the entire rest of spectrum. >> we billionaires are
of the busiest travel days of the year. what caused this deadly train the roman in new york? thousands of dollars in donations taken during a burglary of a local salvation army. the votes have been counted. the panda cub has a name. we begin with that incident in new york. a search for answers into what caused a commuter train to derail in the bronx. four people were killed and dozens injured as a train came close to landing and the harlem river. we have learned that the passengers killed ranged in age from 35 to 59. they all lived in new york. one of the victims was an audio technician for the today show. tom roussey joins us with the survivor story. >> as you said, this was a commuter train. it started appearing poughkeepsie new york. its ultimate destination was grand central station but in the bronx, it suddenly left the tracks. passengers say they never saw it coming. >> they are letting trains go through. >> investigators are looking at whether speed or something else made the train derail on a sharp curve just before a stop in the new york city borough of the bronx. >> our mission is to un
this is al jazeera america live from new york city i'm johnathan betz were a look at today's top stories. >> a train journey into disaster at the edge of the harlem river in new york. killing four people aboard. >> by the time i looked up it was completely going off it's track and there was the rubble from under the track just flying at my face. now safety investigators try to understand what happened. protestors in bangkok confront police using tear gas and water cannons. >> and world aids day is marked around the globe as the struggle to prevent and cure the deadly disease moves forward. ♪ >> an early morning train ride into new york turned into a nightmare today. a passenger train derailed narrowly missing the harlem river. seven cars in the metro north train came off the tracks just outside of the station in new york city. four people are dead and dozens more are hurt. they were heading south to grant central terminal in manhattan. right now the fire department says there are 63 reported injuries and 11 are in transit call conditions and six injuries are reported serious. >
spies infiltrated the british ranks in new york and are credited with turning the tide of the war. this program is about an hour. >> host: this is a turkic and engrossing book. "telling me why he did george washington need the rain and where did he get it? >> guest: thank you first off. he has a numbers problem and experience problem and i believe that cops he had 9,000 the british entered the 40,000. >> over the whole course -- >> guest: over the whole course and they get up to 80,000. washington sees that happened in new york and he was almost annihilated and assault a revolution right before his eyes after all the success in massachusetts -- >> what year are we? >> guest: 1776 is when he really comes over after the success at bunker hill. the british say you want boston i will give you boston and they go to canada to regroup. washington said i know when they are coming back to new york. so they come back to new york city and he says you can't face them. you can' can to be can't beat td so he has to use espionage and the guerrilla warfare. he has to be smarter bandanna. so it's
train derailment in new york city, as we have been reporting here at fox news. authorities say four passengers have been killed in that early morning train derailment that happened in the bronx, new york, right next to the spuyten duyvel station in the southern part of the bronx. happening this morning, dozens more have been injured. you're looking at the aerial video of the scene. we're told four train cars of the train flew off the track as it was going into the curve. that was just a few hundred yards from the station. the train from poughkeepsie going south to new york city this morning. hello, everyone. i'm eric shawn. welcome to america's news headquarters on this sunday. >> i'm jamie colby. there are numerous emergency crews on the scene. we'll stay on the story and let you know if the numbers change. the map will show you exactly where the crash happened. for those of you who don't live in new york, it's in the bronx. basically, it was about to pull into the station, a time where you would expect the train to be slowing down. instead, it was going so fast that it literally,
to new york. they come back to new york city and he knows he cannot be to them so he has to use espionage a and a guerrilla warfare agent be smarter than that and to anticipate them so it is the logic that he needs a spy for sale of his own cia. then you find out he has the huge the espionage background. from the event:dash french and indian war so he tells others that this is where we meet we have to find these people to help me out. >> host: so just to fill in the brat -- background tell us what he did in the friendships and indian war. >> guest: i did not study it extensively but he was an officer to work with the french and find out what were they thinking here or there? and he also made mistakes. he was way too aggressive as a colonel at that point and he learned from that. that is something else it is fantastic about washington. he who could do nothing wrong made mistakes agent he learned from it and he wrote it down and chronicled everything. my goal was to bring washington to live and to let average ordinary people go from this generation what they're capable of doing by looking a
perhaps until the weekend, until the power comes back on. rob nelson, abc news, new york. >>> and more snow could soon add to the misery of those without the power. >> meteorologist jim dickey joining us this morning from the weather channel with more. jim? >> good morning, john and reena, tracking some snowfall this morning. most of it fairly light. it's moving across lake michigan, tracking eastward, as we head on through the early morning hours. for most of us, just a nuisance event across much of pennsylvania, new york, up into new england. a light snow through the day. a coating of an inch or two at most. this low will strengthen, move up the coast and bring a band of heavier snow to portions of maine. especially along the coast. three to six inches through the night. behind this system, fresh arctic air. that's diving into the northern tier of the country. that will move towards the east as we head towards new year's eve. john and reena, back to you. >>> hot and dry conditions on the west coast are being blamed for sparking a wildfire burning north of los angeles. new video shows
night and friday. perhaps bringing more than a foot of snow to places like new york city, hartford and boston. i'm eric fisher for cbs news. >>> residents of a small town in southwest north dakota have been forced to evacuate following a derailment of a train carrying crude oil. it derailed 25 northwest of fargo. railroad officials say about 20 cars caught fire and burned through the night. there were several explosions. susan mcginnis has details. >> reporter: explosions sent flames and thick black smoke billowing into the sky after a train carrying crude oil derailed near casselton, north dakota, about half an hour west of fargo. >> we were taking a nap, then all of a sudden, we heard this big boom. and we ran outside and seen black smoke and then orange smoke. >> reporter: as night fell monday, local authorities warned a shift in the winds could push potentially toxic fumes from the blaze over the town of casselton. >> there's a very heavy plume of smoke and carcinogen from the burning wreckage of those cars. >> reporter: police urged all 2400 residents to evacuate. >> just grab
train derailed in the bronx, new york. the operator of the train is among those injured. several cars derailed on a curve on that track. >> working worldwide to eradicate aids. today marks the 25th anniversary of world aids day. this years' theme is getting to zero. a call for zero discrimination towards those with hiv and aids. >> and 30,000 protestors attacked government buildings in thailand today. they took control of the state broadcaster and forced the president to take refuge in the state compound. until yesterday it had remained peaceful. >> again back to the breaking news out of the bronx new york. the metro north passenger train derailed this morning. there are four fatalities and several serious injuries several cars derailed as the train headed southward taking off from poughkeepsie that is where it departed heading towards grand central station in manhattan. it appears that all of the injured have been taken to area hospitals right now the fdny say 63 reported injuries and of those 63, 11 are critical. and 7 are said to be serious the ntsb which will lead the investigatio
in the "new york times" story this morning that 30 to 40% of the site, the back end functions, ways insurers get reimbursed has not been built yet. there's this much ambiguity this late date six months after. looking at a pretty bad situation, a crisis looming, is really, really embarrassing for the president. you look at the political numbers, they don't look great. taken a big hit over the last few weeks. we're in this situation we're kind of talking ourselves into. maybe in january they come around. by 2017 everything is going to be okay. >> by 2050 this thing is really going to be -- robert, i want to ask you about a point ben is making. i have to ask you as communications guru what you make of this quote from i believe it was jeffrey zients. while more work to be done the team is operating with private sector velocity and effectiveness, a statement our own chuck todd is an indictment of the whole idea of government as a solution. was that a well worded statement in your mind? >> sometimes the truth is the best way to go at it. this has been a completely unnecessary embarrassment. whethe
of the world? which weis one file hold jointly with "the new york times." >> the other finals -- this is important in respect to the inquiry -- obviously, the context is important, but there is criticism that some of these files may not be under your control. they are under your control one way or the other? >> i think it would be helpful if i could give some context. understandtant to that there were four different sets of information that went to four different parties in four different countries on three different continents. i think it is important to establish that. one of them was "the guardian." one of them was "the washington post," clearly not under my control. one went to rio. one went to germany. that was the hand of cards we were all dealt, if you like. obviously say that "the washington post" is under my control. >> we are in touch with "the new york times." we may take evidence from them in the future. in terms of the files under your control, 99% has not been published. you have full control. you know where they are. they are secure and in a place where you feel
here, you know, in new york city. >> host: now, how much of the early research that you did and the early effort that youen gauged in -- you engaged in in trying to fashion sort of the thesis of "battle for ground zero," how much of this was your evaluation of political pressures, economic pressures, pressures -- emotional human nature? >> guest: i mean, it was all of those things. i think that's what was so interesting and why this place so important, because it concentrates, you know, one 16-acre piece of land. you have political pressures, people running for office, you have politicians involved who care about this place and need to make something happen there. you have people who are leasing the buildings who have billions of dollars at stake, you know, in rebuilding commercial space. then you have new yorkers who live around the area, you have family members who have lost loved ones, you know, nearly 3,000 people were killed. and then you have americans and people from around the world who saw what happened, and they also feel connected. and so you have so many differen
bombshell report on ben gi from the new york times. >> the report claiming an anti islamic film sparked the attacks of thank killed four americans not al qaeda. >> they are boiling the waters around here especially those in congress that have been investigating the attack. one of the key assertions is that al qaeda did not play a role in orchestrating the attacks in benghazi something that is at odds with many of the continuing investigations in capitol hill. >>al of that would directly contradict what the new york times says was an exhaustive investigation. tells me people weren't doing the intelligence gathering when you put that volume of information i think it proves that that is not accurate. >> and the report also says the largely discredited theory it was in part to an anti islamic video and those who have been reviewing classified evidence there are also questions about the time of the source. >> i think where the new york times reports adds value and also they didn't have the same access to people who were not aware they were being listened to or interviewed or had a reason to
ago in a faraway land when i was a reporter for the times, "the new york times," i wrote a story about a study that two sociologists had released from university, state university at albany in which they said that immigrants were no longer going to the city. they were, in fact, bypassing the cities and moving to suburbia. and this was happening all over the country and not just with hispanic immigrants, but all immigrants. and so i wrote a story about that, and and what they said to professors was that this would have consequences, that it would have consequences in terms of politics, in terms of elections, but also -- and we've seen that -- but also in terms of tension and all kinds of things. so i wrote a story then in 1996 and made a mental note to follow be up. -- follow up. i never did. it's one of those things reporters up -- you know, reporters just kind of move on to the next story. so when i heard about marcelo lucero, i thought this was in many ways, sadly, the perfect follow-up. because everything that they said would happen in suburbia had, in fact, happened this suffolk co
't you stay with the company. do. new york city where this cause as much a part of the city as the sky nine. with dreams and illusions are intertwined funny kabul and new york is the cultural capital. all the while. she came here from gemini just four weeks ago it's a bold move by china can stream is to make it on broadway. ideally with a row in fact some of the opera if this site out of me to use an aldi up then she says our little star she went on his phone. yeahh the net which come to new york to find germans who are living the american dream. what drives them. also they have to overcome. to find some of the opera when she was always held. and the budding singer fell in love with the story of the clientele it became an oprah style. she said is just as safe as seattle she says the story captivated her when she found sort of musical production moved to. she wanted to be like christine to be a singer. now she says she's concert to go. on the cookbook. i know wants to make it be just like your favorite musical protagonist on the twenty five euro will only be added to stay in new york wi
and if you think i'm being unfair, let me know. let's get to it. joining me in new york, an anchor for arise tv and we have a political reporter. >> was it the most important story of the week? important at all? >> of course not. this is clearly not the most important story of the week. guess what? it's a slow news week. we're in the holiday season and nothing is better than a faux scandal to generate faux headlines. >> you don't think we should cover nsa revelations or drone strike in yemen instead? >> why cover that when you can talk about phil robertson's racist rants? who cares about national security? >> you're channeling news editors and producers so well right now. is that how it works here in this town? >> it's not the most important story of the week. i think it taps into a nerve about the culture wars. i think people on both sides of the aisle felt strongly about this. from a conservative standpoint, this taps into concerns about liberal media bias. there was a politico breakfast where a lot of journalists sort of conceded that the media has a lot of liberals and few hunters. this
in new york city, a live shot right now. welcome to america's news headquarters on this snowy saturday in new york city. hello, i'm greg. this storm forcing airports to cancel nearly 1,000 flights between philadelphia and ohio. there you see philadelphia on the left. cleveland on the right. the national weather service now predicting anywhere between 6 to 14 inches of snow over sections of new england. the howling winds and bitter cold, making things harder for road and utility crews on high alert to clear the highways and restore electricity to a great many homes. we have our meteorologist standing by. >> it's been a really cold december. i think by the time this is done we might be dealing with one of the coldest decembers we've seen in decades across the u.s. it gives you an idea of the temps cold across the northern at least new england and much of new york. and pennsylvania. that's going to change, though. there's going to be warmer air coming in as we develop this coastal low that will start to bring warmer air in from the south. wind direction change. right now, snow done in chi
have the breaking details next. >> that "new york times" report on the benghazi terror attacks completely false? what eyewitnesses on the ground that day are saying this morning to fox. >> and steve and anna, playful or too close for comfort? look. >> the very moment a tiger pouncen on its owner all caught on camera, all here on "fox & friends" which begins right now. >> it's "fox & friends." >> welcome aboard, folks. it is the monday before new year's eve and it is a pleasure to be back on the couch. >> yeah. good morning everybody. nice to have you guys back. >> good to be back. one of our kids had to work on christmas day, so the doocys loaded up the truck and we went down south to visit them. >> and watch them. >> that's right. he has a very visible kind of job. so it was a very nice holiday for the doocy family. >> we had a great christmas at home, went to midnight mass on christmas eve. then we had family. we had family again this week. and it's great. it's an exciting week. >> i was holding down the fort here and crashed a friend's family dinner. it was nice. >> i forget
legislation passed in connecticut, new york, colorado, maryland, and states that have often led the way for federal change. and you think of women suffrage, and it was women who made that happen. >> yesterday's shooting in colorado played out an all too familiar scenario. 18-year-old carl pearson walked into arapahoe high school with a shotgun looking for a teacher. he didn't find him but he shot and critically wound we're live to tell what you is happening. paul, what is thhe west parking, this morning at 8:00 a.m. that was open for students and parents to come pick up their cars, teachers as happened, andl as what he knew about the attacker. >> he's quiet and has weird logic, just weird inside, not something that a normal high schooler would think about. >> like what? >> just like he was a sel self-proclaimed communist, just his ideas. things like that. just didn't--he's really smart r here i in arapahoe county. >> a hearse carrying mandela's body arrived in his hometown of qunu today. he'll be bury there tomorrow. we're in qunu right now telling us what the mood is like there. the mo
rights as american citizens? congressman peter king of new york is about to join me live. >>> time for a quick check of the headlines now. utility companies in michigan say they expect to restore power to most of their customers this weekend. nearly 32,000 homes and businesses still without electricity one week after that massive ice storm slammed the midwest. that system also being blamed for problems in the northeast. some 4,000 remain without power in maine. now another blast of winter targeting the area this weekend could cause more outages. and 1.3 million americans receivi receiving unemployment benefits will see them expire today if congress does not act. >>> two judges making conflicting rulings on the legality of the nsa's sweeping surveillance practices of snooping on all of us. a federal judge in new york dismissed the case saying the nsa's data collection program is legal. this comes one week after a federal judge in d.c. ruled that same program likely violates the constitution. a final decision could be decided by the supreme court. joining us live, congressman peter k
>> investigators are trying to determine if speed played a role in a deadly train crash in new york city. four people were killed and dozens injured when the train went off the rails on a sharp curve. >> thousands of demonstrators are camped out in key ive a day after demonstrations took a terrible turn. >> the white house says healthcare.gov is running smoothly. now it faces a new test - a rush to sign up before this month's deadline. >> blast off - china's first mission to the moon. the jade rabbit gets ready to explore. >> welcome to al jazeera america. thank you so much for joining us. i'm morgan radford live from new york city. >> crews are working to clear the scene of a fatal train derailment in new york city. a southbound commuter train went off the tracks in the bronx as it headed into manhattan. at least four are dead. 63 more were injured much had those 11 are in critical continue. al jazeera's kilmeny duchardt has more from the bronx. >> firefighters, police, crews and the m.t.s.b. continue to work through the night, checking the tracks, cars, mechanical equipment, to tr
cities, including pittsburgh and new york. man: new york city went to philadelphia and said, "you know, we're thinking of developing a hudson river water supply -- what do you suggest we do?" and they said, "we've had "a lot of problems on the schuylkill. "don't go to the hudson river. go to the upland and work by gravity." and that's what new york city did. they first went to the hudson highlands, but 150 years later, it went to the delaware highlands. and really diverted the water that normally went to philadelphia to new york city. i don't think they anticipated that. narrator: the majority of new york city's drinking water comes from watersheds in upstate new york. a watershed is the area of land where water from rain or snow melt drains downhill into a body of water. mountains act as a funnel to feed rivers and lakes. and in this case, reservoirs. in the new york city system, water is collected and stored in 19 reservoirs, which can hold more than a year's supply -- over 580 billion gallons of water. almost all of the system is fed by gravity, without the use of energy-consuming p
ended over the summer. new york city's mayor michael bloomberg is leaving, too, after more than a decade at city hall. >> new york city has never been stronger than it is today, and i think it's fair to say that our future has never been brighter. >> reporter: in the final speech of the term, he said his city today is drastically different from the one he took glover i think it's safe to say that it's clear that the golden age of the suburb is over, and it is being replaced by a new urban renaissance redefining the future. >> reporter: violence, governmental dysfunction, decay. in the 1970s new york lost more than 10% of its population. it was a center of a growing trend of cities around the country where middle class residents were fleeing fast to the suburbs. >> if you want to change the world, run for mayor. >> i, michael r. bloomberg do solemnly swear... >> ly after the september 11th attacks he took over investing . it would be his legacy and inspiration to other metropolitan areas around the country. today crime is way down in new york. perhaps in part due to a tough and controver
minutes. >>> and meanwhile, a "new york times" report is now casting doubt on al qaeda's involvement in the deadly september 11th attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi last year. instead, that "new york times" report says the assault was fueled in large part by anger at an american-made video mocking islam and carried out by several groups with different agendas. we welcome you, a good morning. everyone, good to have you here, and welcome to america's news headquarters. i'm jamie colby. >> and i'm eric shawn. good morning, hello, and new information in the "new york times" seems to conflict with other versions of the event. now what has been reported this morning mesh with everything else we have learned so far? that conflicts with what the chief of the intelligence committee is saying and others. what does it also mean for our country, to a region that is awash with islamic terrorists? joining us as always is former u.s. ambassador to the united nations, john bolton, who is a fox news contributor. good morning from los angeles. >> good morning. glad to be with you. >> the "new yo
polasky, which is in upstate new york. rob, good morning. >> reporter: good morning to you, dan. it is a balmy seven degrees this morning. much of upstate new york has seen several feet of snow over the past few days. and like much of us along the east coast, they are now bracing for round two of some wicked weather. winter wonderland. how about one of the biggest snowstorms of the year. and it's not even officially winter yet. 20 states from the midwest to the northeast are on alert for snowfall today. upstate new yorkers are digging themselves out of a whopping six feet of snow in redfield. and four feet in coldon. plows and snowblowers are out in full force, after the monster snowfall left residents riding their snowmobiles instead of cars. >> it's snow. a bus load. you're bound to have snow sooner or later. >> reporter: in missouri, snow and ice caused treacherous roads that caused accidents. >> the back roads are ice and snow. it makes it hard to drive on and everything. >> reporter: they've begun their preparation process, filling up trucks with salt and brine early friday
philadelphia and new york city, holiday shoppers hit the streets in shirt sleeves on this second day of winter as record breaking temperatures soared into the 60s and even 70s. the weather channel's mike seidel is in a colder and snowier wisconsin to start us off. hello. >> reporter: hello, lester. from wisconsin, we have a snowstorm. a wild weekend, everything, snow and ice, tornados and floods and at least six deaths attributed to this extreme weather. an emergency declared in parts of new england and upstate new york. thick ice, freezing rain and high winds prompted the governor of new york to activate the state emergency center. more than 1,000 plows deployed to clear roads of up to two inches of ice. downed power lines knocked out electricity to more than 300,000 customers in michigan and tens of thousands more in new york, maine and vermont. >> about 2:30 this morning, we awoke to the house shaking, transformers exploding, the skies lighting up, trees falling. >> reporter: the storm stretches north to toronto. hundreds of thousands of residents remain without power. utility companies the
new york city, and this situation was going on so near -- actually between new york city and the hamptons, and maybe not so many loss, but so many people from new york drive to the hamptons every weekends that maybe they don't look sideways and think, you know, this is going on here. these people are our neighbors, and it's happening right next door to us. that's the second reason i was attracted to the story, and the third reason, because as you know, i'm an immigrant myself. i came from cuba when i was 16 years old, a boarded a boat named manana, and i wrote a book about it called "finding manana," and i felt connected to the story. those of us who came from cuba in 1980 came to be known because the boat lift, and it became a derogatory term, but one i like and use with pride, but it became derogatory, no question about it. i see countries of labels, and what that means, what how much they request hurt, how much they can contain an entire group of people. they, at a certain point, criminality or criminals and it's close, and that label of illegality hunted the people wh
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